At Erie Insurance, our classic car insurance takes this into consideration and values your car on a “stated amount” basis. That means we determine the value of your vehicle up front, before a loss happens. For vintage cars valued at $30,000 and up, our professional material damage appraiser will even inspect and value your vehicle. You’ll know ahead of time what your vehicle has been valued at so there are no surprises should a partial or total loss happen.    
Insurance companies require that a collectible car not be used as a primary driving vehicle. They also place maximum annual mileage restrictions on its use, the ceiling for which will depend on your state but usually not exceed 7,500 miles per year. Most classic vehicle policyholders are limited to using the automobile only for pleasure driving or a hobby activity, such as participating in a parade, show or exhibition. Many insurers will not cover a claim if you use the classic auto to drive to work, shops, or other destinations.

Liberty Mutual is one of the top insurance companies in the U.S. and has been around for over 100 years. Liberty Mutual also has large international presence—with operations in 17 countries. The international companies sell property and casualty, health and life insurance policies. The auto insurance industry is a large part of Liberty Mutual’s business, representing 36% of their net written premium from insurance as of their latest annual report.


Southern Farm Bureau, a division of the Farm Bureau insurance company, earned a solid A+ financial stability rating from A.M. Best. However, that’s where the ratings end; the insurance company division was too small to be rated by J.D. Power or Consumer Reports. That being said, the broader Farm Bureau insurance company is rated Very Good in both claims process and claims payment speed on Consumer Reports, an indication that you’ll be in good hands with the company’s smaller divisions.

If you live in the South, Midwest, or Mid-Atlantic regions, Erie Insurance is worth your consideration. Erie has consistently received high marks from J.D. Power and Consumer Reports, but didn’t make it into my top four recommendations due to limited availability — it only serves residents in Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and certain parts of DC.
This is pretty ridiculous considering the fact that: 1st, I had regularly asked my former insurance company for reviews and discounts; 2nd, I recently got a speeding ticket in a school zone (which I am a bit ashamed to say) just before I switched; and 3rd, that $1,100 savings was before I got an additional discount for bundling my home insurance on my policy (which is a lot lower now too).
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