Switching to Amica from State Farm because I reviewed my State Farm policy and found that they are no longer paying to return my vehicle to "pre-loss" condition, and instead they are only paying for what is competative in the market area. I have been with State Farm for over 12 years, and recently read my policy booklet, and found this out. Based on the way State Farm's auto policies read I am very unhappy. State Farm gets to dictate what is competative in the market area, and because the majority of the shops in my area are not good shops, State Farm will not pay to have my vehicle repaired properly because it isn't competative in the market area as my policy reads. This also means that if I hit someone and they take their vehicle to a quality shop and State Farm does not pay for the cost to repair the other party's vehicle properly, then I can be sued by the person I hit. I expect more from my insurance, and I hope others do to. After contacting Amica I have found their ...more
Esurance's easy-to-use online quoting system is designed to help you personalize a plan so that you only pay for coverage you actually need. That way, you can get the best available auto insurance rates without forfeiting quality protection. Our low-cost options in Texas range from the most basic liability coverage — the minimum level of car insurance required by the state — to more comprehensive coverages that could financially protect you against a whole host of hazards. Plus, our long list of available discounts can help reduce your premium.
Auto insurance is financial protection, and not just for the investment you made when you bought your car. After a really serious accident, bills for damage and injuries can easily reach into hundreds of thousands of dollars. If you happen to cause such a wreck, the victims could sue you. In the worst case scenario, assets such as your savings and home could be seized.

I was with Liberty Mutual for about 15 years and was very satisfied with their prices and service, although I never filed a claim. When I retired and moved from California to Florida, my auto rate went up a ridiculous amount, to almost $10,000 a year even though I had no accidents and one minor moving violation in the last ten years. On top of that, Liberty Mutual screwed up my umbrella policy and told me it was “unenforceable,” whatever that means, but I had to pay for the policy anyway up to the time I canceled and switched to Progressive, which cost about one third the cost of Liberty Mutual for an identical policy. Even good companies change over time.

Milewise (an Allstate company) is worth looking into if you drive very little, though we can’t get rate estimates because it requires a device to plug into your car to track mileage. You’re charged a daily rate, plus a per-mile rate, and the company says customers who drive 135 miles or less per week can save 10% or more. The less you drive, the lower your insurance bill, but if you want to take a road trip, don’t worry — you won’t be charged for more than 150 miles per day.
Matthew thanks for posting this. You’re absolutely right. USAA has gone down the tubes, I dont get it, a simple claim recently for auto, turned into a nightmare. bouncing my calls all over the country with a bunch of idiots for claim reps answering the phones, and forcing my car into total loss when it should not have been, and paying only a portion of the damage even though I have collision.
If you find yourself away from the wheel more times than not, a pay-per mile auto insurance company like Metromile may be the best company to go with. Metromile is one of the first companies in the U.S. where a bulk of a driver's premium is determined by how much they drive. How much is too much? We found that generally for Metromile to be a good deal, drivers should only drive 7,500 miles or less per year. The biggest downsides to Metromile is a mediocre record of claims handling, in addition to the company only being available in seven states: CA, IL, NJ, OR, PA, VA, WA.
Classic car insurance is a bit of a simplified term. There are several "non-traditional" vehicles that these companies actually insure that do not fall under the term of "classic car". Whether you have a modified street rod, a kit car, vintage motorcycle, 1920's milk truck, or even a retired military vehicle, at least one of the following will be able to insure it.
×