Compare popular auto insurance companies' financial stability and claims satisfaction ratings to better understand the quality of service they will provide. Claims satisfaction — measured by J.D. Power — is ranked on a scale of 2 to 5, with 5 being "among the best" and 2 being "the rest." Financial strength — calculated by A.M. Best and running from "Superior" to "Poor" — determines an insurer's financial strength and ability to meet its policy and contractual obligations.
In April 2018, Northwest Arkansas News shared the story of a Siloam Springs woman who, after being hit by a city-owned tractor-trailer, found herself with medical bills in excess of $80,000. The city-owned vehicle carried Arkansas’s minimum 25/50/25 policy, which only provided $25,000 towards the woman’s medical bills; the woman carried $25,000 in uninsured/underinsured motorist insurance, which left $30,000 in medical bills she owed out of pocket. Because the tractor-trailer was a city vehicle, the woman was not able to sue for the remainder of her damages.
Let’s say you live in Florida and cause an accident that injures another person to the tune of $40,000. If you only have the state’s minimum bodily injury protection ($10,000 per person, $20,000 per accident), you’d be responsible for the remaining $30,000. But, if you had purchased more than Florida’s minimum — say $50,000 per person and $100,000 per accident — you wouldn’t have to pay a single dime out of pocket.
Young drivers — aged between 16 and 25 — pay very high car insurance rates, with those aged 16-19 paying the most expensive premiums of all. Because of the risk presented by inexperienced drivers, teen drivers pay more than three times the national average for car insurance. In Tennessee, teen drivers pay insurance rates in line with the national average: $4,741 per year.
No matter whether you buy liability coverage or full coverage for your vehicle, you need to pick a deductible that meets you needs. Consumer Reports suggests choosing a higher deductible if you want to save on monthly premiums, but setting a lower deductible if you want to avoid a large out-of-pocket expense in the event of a car accident. “If you have a good driving record and haven’t had an at-fault accident in years, or ever, opting for a higher deductible on collision coverage might be a good bet,” writes Consumer Reports. Just remember to keep that much cash on hand in case you need it.

This is pretty ridiculous considering the fact that: 1st, I had regularly asked my former insurance company for reviews and discounts; 2nd, I recently got a speeding ticket in a school zone (which I am a bit ashamed to say) just before I switched; and 3rd, that $1,100 savings was before I got an additional discount for bundling my home insurance on my policy (which is a lot lower now too).
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