For every claim free year, the insured is rewarded with a discount on the renewal premium. This discount is called - No Claim Bonus (NCB). It is cumulative and increases every year. It usually ranges from 10% to 50% and can save a substantial amount of money on the premium payable for your auto insurance. Let's take an example if a policyholder doesn't make a claim during the tenure of his auto insurance policy, he becomes eligible for No Claim Bonus, on the basis of which, a certain rebate is offered on the payable premium.
State legislators set limits on how much a company can increase your rates after a crash. Our hypothetical accident resulted in only $2,000 worth of damage. That caused average annual rates to spike by $1,000 or more in some states, while others jumped by far less. One thing’s for sure: Your rates will definitely increase after an at-fault accident, so be sure to compare car insurance rates if you have one on record.
As with any credit check, a record of this search will remain on your file – and your credit rating will affect the amount of APR that you’re charged. If you have a poor credit rating, you may be charged up to 20% APR. And if you’ve struggled to pay credit in the past, or if you have a CCJ to your name, then you may be denied the option to pay monthly. If you think you’ll have issues with your credit rating, you can read our guide on improving your credit score.
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